News Release

All News & Events

Cessna Citation Latitude prototype reaches maximum performance envelope

WICHITA, Kan., Feb 25, 2014 – Cessna Aircraft Company, a Textron Inc. (NYSE: TXT) company, is celebrating another testing milestone with the Citation Latitude. In only the aircraft’s third flight, the Latitude prototype has successfully achieved full envelope performance for maximum speed (440 KTAS, 506 mph), Mach speed (0.80) and altitude (45,000 ft). The aircraft was cleared for a direct climb to 45,000 ft with a gross takeoff weight of 29,000 pounds.

Scott Ernest, Cessna president and CEO, says: “Following last week’s first flight, we are seeing the Citation Latitude’s high-speed capabilities. The Latitude is an aircraft that delivers a lot of firsts from Cessna – the wide fuselage, the stand-up cabin with a flat floor, auto-throttles, the electric door and the improved cabin environment. All these achievements stem from listening to the voice of the customer and getting down to the business of delivering what customers need and desire. Cessna’s Citation Latitude is a breakthrough aircraft in many ways, and these successful flights are a testament to our rigorous testing procedures. The Citation Latitude is a clear and resounding affirmation of Cessna’s commitment to new product development, and we feel it delivers an incredible amount of performance and style to the mid-size category.”

Michael Thacker, Cessna senior vice president of engineering, says: “From an engineering perspective, I am very proud our team has designed an aircraft that is proceeding in a very predictable, reliable manner and displaying characteristics of a very mature system in its first few flights.”

The next tests for the Latitude will focus on low-speed performance. Certification for the Citation Latitude is expected in the second quarter of 2015.

Citation Latitude air to air video 
Citation Latitude air to air photo 
Citation Latitude air to air photo

###

About Cessna
Unmatched experience in aircraft design and manufacturing has established Cessna Aircraft Company as the world’s general aviation authority. Since its inception in 1927, Cessna has designed, produced and delivered nearly 200,000 airplanes around the globe. This includes more than 6,600 Citation business jets, making it the largest fleet of business jets in the world. Today, Cessna has two principal lines of business: aircraft sales and aftermarket services. Aircraft sales include Citation business jets, Caravan single-engine utility turboprops and single-engine utility and high performance piston aircraft. Aftermarket services include parts, maintenance, inspection and repair services. In 2013, Cessna delivered 467 aircraft, including 139 Citation business jets, and reported revenues of $2.784 billion. More information about Cessna Aircraft Company is available at cessna.com.

About Textron
Textron Inc. is a multi-industry company that leverages its global network of aircraft, defense, industrial and finance businesses to provide customers with innovative solutions and services. Textron is known around the world for its powerful brands such as Bell Helicopter, Cessna Aircraft Company, Jacobsen, Kautex, Lycoming, E-Z-GO, Greenlee, and Textron Systems. More information is available at textron.com.

Certain statements in this press release are forward-looking statements which may project revenues or describe strategies, goals, outlook or other non-historical matters; these statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. These statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, the efficacy of research and development investments to develop new products or unanticipated expenses in connection with the launching of significant new products or programs; the timing of our new product launches or certifications of our new aircraft products; our ability to keep pace with our competitors in the introduction of new products and upgrades with features and technologies desired by our customers; changes in government regulations or policies on the export and import of our products; volatility in the global economy or changes in worldwide political conditions that adversely impact demand for our products; performance issues with key suppliers or subcontractors; difficult conditions in the financial markets which may adversely impact our customers’ ability to fund or finance purchases of our products; and continued demand softness or volatility in the markets in which we do business.